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ArtsAndCraftsTile.com

Mission Style

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Mission Style Chairs

 

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Mission Style Clock
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Mission Style

 

The word "Mission" is in reference to the Spanish missions built in California during the colonial era from 1769 to 1833. Mission style design and furniture originated in the late 19th Century. The history can be traced to a chair design made by A.J. Forbes around 1894 for San Francisco's Swedenborgian Church.
 

The "Mission style" was first popularized by Joseph P. McHugh, a New York furniture manufacturer and retailer. McHugh copied these chairs and created a product line of home furnishings. The Mission Style designs owed little to the original furnishings of the Spanish missions but were associated with the American Arts and Crafts movement. The style became increasingly popular following the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo in 1901.


The Mission style emphasizes simple horizontal and vertical lines and flat panels that accentuate the grain of the wood (usually oak). The modern Mission style tends to be heavier than Art and Crafts style, while the styles are nearly identical in material and fabrication.
 

Gustav Stickley produced Arts and Crafts furniture often referred to as being in the Mission Style, while he personaly dismissed the term as misleading.   This was plain oak furniture that was upright, solid, and suggestive of entirely handcrafted work, though in the case of Stickley and his competitors, each was constructed in a factory by both machine and handworking techniques.


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